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Luis De Jesus Los Angeles
2685 S La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 | T 310 838 6000

NEWS

September 11, 2009

SEZIO INTERVIEW: DAVID ADEY

Art-making has always married craft and concept but in the development of contemporary art method, the tradition of studying and mastering a specific trade or medium has been slowly replaced by the drive to explore new and unique ideas. At times, the conceptual nature of art in the 20th century and beyond can disregard the value of finely tuned and carefully practiced skills. The work of Dave Adey, who is unbound to any specific media, rests in an interesting realm of craft as he spends much of his studio time developing new processes necessary to manifest his ideas.   more

Between working in graphic design, teaching at Point Loma Nazarene University, and remodeling his own home Dave is an expert craftsman in many realms. He works exhaustively to create polished, well-built pieces using unique processes. Dave’s expertise in odd and unknown systems remind us of an interesting aspect of humanity: our ability to develop detailed understandings and trained skills, both intentionally and unintentionally. The messages in Dave Adey’s art are presented in meticulously and seamlessly crafted work that demonstrates a commitment to understanding surroundings through dedicated study and practice read more

September 11, 2009

SCREEN TEST FOR “ARTARCTICHUH?”, NEW WEB DRAMA FROM JASON SHERRY AND MATT HOYT (WORMWOOD FILMS)

“ARTARCTICHUH?” is the new web drama produced by Matt Hoyt and Wormwood Films, with set design by Jason Sherry, who also stars in the action-packed series. The series will premiere is the not-too-distant future. In episode one, Preston (Matt Hoyt) decides to take a job in “Antarctichuh?” in order to escape the moisture-starved depravity of Southern California. Since anything is possible in “Antarctichuh?” it leads Preston into a series of misadventures unlike anything seen since “Small Wonder”.   more

CRITICS RAVE: “ANTARCTICHUH? IS STUPID!”

STAY TUNED!…“ANTARCTICHUH?” IS COMING!  watch priview

August 29, 2009

GROUP HUG: 20-ARTIST SHOW IS A DECISIVE STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

BY ROBERT PINCUS, The San Diego Union-Tribune

“SOCIAL CLIMBING,” the title of the 20-artist exhibition at Seminal Projects, should be taken ironically — at least in part. It draws attention to the idea of a pecking order in a given art scene, with a skeptical eye. The point, as the news release for the show says, is that hierarchies are often arbitrary.   more

They need to be questioned and what better way of critiquing them than to bring fresh talent into the gallery.

Still, questioning a hierarchy doesn’t mean you want to destroy it. Instead, the idea is to revise it, make room for new artists in the loose structure. Thus the subtitle: “On The Move.” So Seminal Projects isn’t completely negating the notion it chides. read more

August 29, 2009

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO ADDS BRIAN DICK’S “KNICK-KNACK MIMICRY” TO PERMANENT COLLECTION

Luis De Jesus is very happy to announce the recent acquisition by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego of Brian Dick’s Knick-Knack Mimicry. Working in a post-studio style of practice using second-hand objects or domestic products that he finds around the house, Brian Dick continues to examine his fascination with self identity through self-portraiture.   more

Knick-Knack Mimicry follows the development of a series of self-portraits created for “Me Me Me”, his second solo exhibition last year at Seminal Projects, in which Dick addressed this quest through mimicry, caricatures and prosthetics. In these photographs Brian delves below the skin by embodying the essence of his subjects (actors and entertainers) through facial memory, or what he terms “muscle mimicry”. In the new Knick-Knack Mimicry series he focuses on capturing the essence of that most humble and quintessential of American home décor objects. These and other works illustrate his continuous dissection of the varying ways the self can be represented. Brian Dick was the recipient of the 2008-2009 San Diego Art Prize in the emerging artist category. 

August 13, 2009

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE FEATURE: “ANDY RALPH PUTS THE ‘MULTI’ IN MULTI TASKER”

BY ROBERT PINCUS

In a sense, everything that Andy Ralph makes feels like an intriguing experiment with materials. Five years ago, for the exhibition to complete his B.A. at Point Loma Nazarene University, he made rubber screws and nails and tools (a saw, a hammer, etc.) with their metal portions beautifully crafted in lead.   more

Two years ago, for his solo exhibition at Spacecraft Gallery in North Park, he concocted fountains with circuitous tubes that gently distributed water on big beds of sponges.

“Every time I make work it seems like I have to do research,” says Ralph.

This isn’t a complaint. He doesn’t consider research to be laborious. Rather, it’s a labor of pleasure, whimsy and wit. read more

August 09, 2009

SD CITYBEAT REVIEW: “MOVING ON UP – NEW EXHIBITION CHALLENGES GALLERY PROTOCOL”

Few of us actually qualify as social climbers. Rather than ambitiously propelling ourselves upward through social strata, most of us are engaged in a slow series of lateral movements&mdashsmall, often imperceptible adjustments made to our lives in a perpetual search for meaning.   more

Ideas shift in and out of our sphere of consciousness; people and things are added and removed from our physical world—all in an effort to construct a context in which life makes sense and to maximize the relevance of our existence.

That’s the idea behind SOCIAL CLIMBING, a two-part exhibition at Seminal Projects (2040 India St., www.seminalprojects.com)—the first of which, Part 1: On the Move, opens Aug. 8. Those led by the title to expect a dose of caustic social commentary will be surprised to find that show curator and Seminal Projects founder Luis De Jesus has created a subtle meditation on the ways in which movement and positioning affect the meaning of art.  http://sdcitybeat.com/cms/story/detail/moving_on_up/8340/

August 01, 2009

‘SOCIAL CLIMBING / PART I: ON THE MOVE’, OPENS SATURDAY, AUGUST 8

Luis De Jesus is very pleased to announce an exciting, two-part group exhibition titled SOCIAL CLIMBING. The first segment of the exhibition, subtitled PART I: ON THE MOVE will open on August 8 and run through September 26. (Part II will open on October 2 and remain on view through December 5, 2009).   more

You are cordially invited to attend the opening reception for SOCIAL CLIMBING—PART I: ON THE MOVE on Saturday, August 8th, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

SOCIAL CLIMBING—PART I: ON THE MOVE will feature works by over 20 artists, representing a bold and fresh, new generation of San Diego talent, among them many of the best and brightest to emerge in a reenergized San Diego art scene over the past few years. The exhibition will explore a wide range of media, from painting, sculpture, collage, and drawing to video, photography, neon, and installation. Participating artists in PART I: ON THE MOVE will include (in alphabetical order): David Adey, Seth Augustine, Lael Corbin, Moya Devine, Deanna Erdmann, James Gielow, Vero Glezqui, Aldo Guerra, Matthew Hebert, Alexander Jackson, Alexander Jarman, Silvia Karabashlieva, Gretchen Mercedes, Lee Puffer, Andy Ralph, Jason Sherry, Robert Twomey, Joseph Yorty, and others. A number of these artists have been presented by Seminal Projects in solo and group exhibitions as well as at art fairs in Miami and Los Angeles.

Behind its pithy, tongue-in-cheek title, SOCIAL CLIMBING offers an ambitious and thought-provoking strategy: an exhibition organized in the form of a continuously changing group show. Over the course of each segment, artworks will be rotated and re-installed alongside different works, allowing them to be considered in new contexts. This ad-hoc “shuffle” strategy will allow SOCIAL CLIMBING to circumvent the traditionally static presentation of many gallery and museum exhibitions and a format that often assigns a prescribed meaning to each artwork within the context of a themed group exhibition. This freedom to mix it up as and when we wish will allow us to literally reinvent the show and find new connections between the artwork exhibited, altering not only the way the individual works and the exhibition are understood and appreciated, but, consequently, of the critical discourse that follows.

SOCIAL CLIMBING takes its cue from legendary New York art dealer Paula Cooper, who in the first years of her SoHo gallery, in the late 1960s and early ‘70s, would change the location of works over and over again during the course of an exhibition, typically lasting several months or more. Through this approach Cooper was able to “show how different works can clarify the information contained in each other by their differences or seeming similarities, and can introduce a dialogue.” Thus, a visitor to a particular show might have discovered a Donald Judd next to a Carl Andre, and, a few weeks later, on a different wall in another location of the gallery, find the same Judd installed next to a Keith Sonnier or a Jackie Winsor.

SOCIAL CLIMBING can also be understood as a critique of the gallery space as real estate and the idea of “positioning” in today’s art world, questioning the very notion of prominence and status among artists and its web of hierarchies. A wide range of personal and social themes will be explored throughout the individual works.

For inquiries, please contact Luis De Jesus at 619-696-9699, or email: info@seminalprojects.com 

July 17, 2009

THE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE REVIEW: ‘RESISTANCE’ IS FUTILE (AND FUN)’

MAY-LING MARTINEZ’S NEW WORKS ARE SIMPLER THAN USUAL, BUT RETAIN THEIR USUAL FLAIR (By Robert Pincus, Union-Tribune Staff Writer)

“Her sculptures are mechanistic and they do work well. But given the nature of her pictorial works, it shouldn’t seem surprising that her ‘machines’ exist to amuse, surprise and maybe even delight us.”

The imagery in May-Ling Martinez’s collages has consistently looked vaguely familiar and yet always appeared odd and surreal at the same time.   more

Sweet-faced children from 1950s and 1960s illustrations, along with occasional adults, have been a staple of her work, looking as if they are caught up in worlds turned topsy-turvy. She’s often transplanted these “people” into a world of diagrams from instructional manuals, seemingly from the same time period ” though, in her work, the diagrams don’t offer any clear instruction. The children from her earlier collages have disappeared, at least for now, in “Measured Resistance,” her solo exhibition at Seminal Projects in Little Italy. Representative men are still present, but they are either tied up or scarred. Then, there are hands, connected to no one at all, that are soldering machinery or handling tools ” and they are eerily large. read more

July 15, 2009

SIGN ON SAN DIEGO REVIEW: MAY-LING MARTINEZ / ‘THE AIR MACHINE AS ART’

I’ve never seen the artist May-Ling Martinez, but I can imagine her in overalls and a hard hat, sawing a perfect circle into the wooden arm rest of what was once a school desk.

I see her breaking up an oscillating fan to get to its sexy parts &mdash the blades and motor. She fixes them under the arm rest’s new hole.   more

Then she tapes black sewing thread onto a bit of cloudy-clear plastic, lets the strings hang down like dried and blackened jellyfish legs, and ties them off above the deconstructed fan.  read more

July 15, 2009

ARTASAUTHORITY.COM REVIEW: ‘MESURED RESISTANCE: MAY-LING MARTINEZ’

“Halftolds is the title of May-ling Martinez’s current exhibit on view at the Art Produce Gallery in San Diego. I didn’t like it. If truth be told, Halftolds as in half-told stories or half-truths makes for an exhibit to this viewer’s eye, half-a-success.” (July 2006)

The above quote was the opening lines to my first review of May-ling Martinez’s solo exhibit at Art Produce Gallery in 2006.   more

A review that many disagreed with including the artist who called me presumptuous, commentators who found my critique half-assed, while still others — including friends and colleagues — I argued with privately and in public over the merits of Martinez’s work.

What a difference three years makes. read more