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June Edmonds

Allegiances & Convictions

May 11 - June 29, 2019

June Edmonds Case for Reparations Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
Case for Reparations Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas mounted on linen
74 x 50 in. 

June Edmonds Claudette Colvin Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
Claudette Colvin Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas mounted on linen
​74 x 50 in. 

June Edmonds League of Six Nations Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
League of Six Nations Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas mounted on linen
​74 x 50 in. 

June Edmonds Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas mounted on linen
​74 x 50 in. 

June Edmonds O.V. Catto Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
O.V. Catto Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas
96 x 60 in. 

June Edmonds Unbought and Unbossed Flag, 2019

June Edmonds
Unbought and Unbossed Flag, 2019
Acrylic on canvas mounted on linen
​74 x 50 in. 

June Edmonds Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), I, 2019

June Edmonds
Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), I, 2019
Acrylic and spray paint on canvas
58 x 88 in.

June Edmonds Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), II, 2019

June Edmonds
Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), II, 2019
Acrylic and spray paint on canvas
​59 x 91 in.

June Edmonds Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), III, 2019

June Edmonds
Carney and The 54th (A Memorial), III, 2019
Acrylic and spray paint on canvas
​59 x 91 in.

Press Release

Allegiances & Convictions explores the American flag as a malleable symbol of ideals, promises, and identity. June Edmonds's new Flag Paintings create space for the inclusion of multiple identities including race, nationality, gender, and political leanings. Each flag is associated with the narrative of an African American, past or present, a current event, or an anecdote from American history. Edmonds investigates the complexities of these stories through the creation of new symbols for Americanness.

Color has played an especially important role in the intersection of Edmonds's personal, political and artistic journeys. Color associations can be tied to culturally symbolic imagery, trauma, and emotion, 

giving color the unique discursive ability to communicate about power and systemic disenfranchisement. The Flag Paintings explore the psychological construct of skin color utilizing the primary colors of brown skin tones to build Edmonds's radical propositions: symbols of American identity that not only more accurately reflect the broader changes in the racial and ethnic makeup of the country's population but the ideals and promises enshrined in the Constitution. With thick, shifting brushstrokes in rich earth colors organized into columns of varying widths, the flags rise vertically, like human portraits. On this, Edmonds's states: "These flags are standing for something - so I'm gonna keep them standing."

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