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Chauney Peck

Out of Site

January 12- February 9, 2008

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site

Installation View of Chauney Peck: Out of Site 

Press Release

LUIS DE JESUS SEMINAL PROJECTS is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by CHAUNEY PECK opening January 12 through February 9, 2008. You are warmly invited to join us for an artist’s reception on Saturday, January 12, from 6-9 pm.

Chauney Peck’s work explores the evolving relationship between humans and the natural world due to excessive consumption of resources. For her first San Diego exhibition, titled Out of Site, Peck will present a new sculptural installation based on the idea of seclusion—or how things that are hidden can’t hurt you. Titled Ocean Tarp, the piece is inspired by what could be considered a man-made wonder of the 21st century: the Eastern Garbage Patch, a massive whirlpool of floating plastic debris in the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii that is approximately twice the size of Texas. Peck states: “Out of Site” refers to the priority of things in sight and the habit of forgetting about hidden objects. Relating to garbage, this habit allows our waste debris to disappear by moving it to hidden places. Once our personal part of removing waste from our possession is over, we begin to believe in its non-existence.” By recreating the surface of the ocean as a tarp-like cover, Peck offers a beguiling metaphor for how we marginalize things that are out of sight. 

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